Compline in time of coronavirus: 4. The Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday

Choir 04-05-2020

The Compline Choir, St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle, April 5, 2020.

While St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle,  is closed to large gatherings, the Office of Compline is sung by a small contingent of choir members to an empty cathedral. Those singing the service are observing strict health precautions including the appropriate social distancing; members over 60 and others vulnerable to contagion are not invited to sing.

The Compline Underground (which originates from Seattle) is now issuing links to the Compline Service together with the texts of the music sung, as well as many of the texts of the unchanging parts of the Office. After the broadcast, the video stream link will change to the archived link, and when the podcast is available, that link will be activated.

To continue to see the words below, and the broadcast or video stream at the same time in another window, just right-click on the link, and select “Open link in new window.”

Live Broadcast            (The service has ended. Follow the links to the Podcast or Video Stream Archive as they become available).

Live Video Stream

Podcast                       (This will link to the Podcast when it is released – 1 or 2 days after the service).

Video Stream Archive  (Now linked to YouTube)

Compline for The Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday

A short passage of scripture is read.

ORISON: Vexilla Regis prodeunt – Plainsong, Mode I; harm. Guillaume Du Fay (c. 1397-1474); ed. Peter R. Hallock & Jason A. Anderson

CHANT
(Latin)
Vexilla Regis prodeunt;
fulget Crucis mysterium,
qua vita mortem pertulit,
et morte vitam protulit.

(Poetic English translation)
The royal banners forward go,
the cross shines forth in mystic glow
where he through whom our flesh was made,
in that same flesh our ransom paid.

HARMONY
(English)
Fulfilled is all that David told
in true prophetic song of old;
how God the nations’ King should be,
for God is reigning from the tree.

(Original Latin)
Impleta sunt quae concinit
David fideli carmine,
dicendo nationibus:
regnavit a ligno Deus.

CHANT
(Latin)
Arbor decora et fulgida,
ornata Regis purpura,
electa digno stipite
tam sancta membra tangere.

(Poetic English translation)
O tree of beauty, O tree most fair,
ordained those holy limbs to bear
gone is thy shame, each crimsoned bough
proclaims the King of glory now.

HARMONY
(English)
Blest tree, whose chosen branched bore
the wealth that did the world restore,
the price which none but he could pay
to spoil the spoiler of his prey.

(Original Latin)
Beata, cuius brachiis
pretium pependit saeculi:
statera facta corporis,
tulitque praedam tartari.

CHANT
(Latin)
Te, fons salutis Trinitas,
collaudet omnis spiritus:
quos per Crucis mysterium
salvas, fove per saecula. Amen.

(Poetic English translation)
To thee, eternal Three in One,
let homage meet by all be done;
as by thy cross thou dost restore
so rule and guide us evermore. Amen.

PREPARATION

READER: The Lord Almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
CHOIR: Amen.

READER: Beloved in Christ, be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: whom resist, steadfast in the faith. [I Peter 5: 8, 9a]

READER: But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

READER: Our help is in the name of the Lord
CHOIR: who hath made heaven and earth.

CONFESSION AND ABSOLUTION

READER: Let us humbly confess our sins unto Almighty God.
CHOIR: We confess to God Almighty, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, that we have sinned in thought, word, and deed, through our own grievous fault. Wherefore we pray God to have mercy upon us.

CHOIR: Almighty God, have mercy upon us, forgive us all our sins and deliver us from all evil, confirm and strengthen us in all goodness, and bring us to life everlasting. Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

READER: May the almighty and merciful Lord grant unto us pardon and remission of all our sins, time for amendment of life, and the grace and comfort of the Holy Spirit.
CHOIR: Amen.

The following is chanted.

CANTOR: O God, make speed to save us;
CHOIR: O Lord, make haste to help us.

CANTOR: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son: and to the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen.

CANTOR: Praise ye the Lord;
CHOIR: The Lord’s name be praiséd.

PSALM 22:1-11 – Plainsong, Tone IV.1

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? *
and are so far from my cry and from the words of my distress?

O my God, I cry in the daytime, but you do not answer; *
by night as well, but I find no rest.

Yet you are the Holy One, *
enthroned upon the praises of Israel.

Our forefathers put their trust in you; *
they trusted, and you delivered them.

They cried out to you and were delivered; *
they trusted in you and were not put to shame.

But as for me, I am a worm and no man, *
scorned by all and despised by the people.

All who see me laugh me to scorn; *
they curl their lips and wag their heads, saying,

“He trusted in the LORD; let him deliver him; *
let him rescue him, if he delights in him.”

Yet you are he who took me out of the womb, *
and kept me safe upon my mother’s breast.

I have been entrusted to you ever since I was born; *
you were my God when I was still in my mother’s womb.

Be not far from me, for trouble is near, *
and there is none to help.

The READER offers the following lesson:

Jesus said, “Come unto me, all ye that labor and are are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn of me: for I am meek and lowly of heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”
[Matthew 11:28-30]

CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

The following Respond is chanted (sung in a polyphonic setting on Palm Sunday):

CANTOR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.
CHOIR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.

CANTOR: For thou hast redeeméd me, O Lord, thou God of truth;
CHOIR: I commend my spirit.

CANTOR: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.

The READER announces the hymn to be sung.

OFFICE HYMN: To you before the close of day – Plainsong, Mode II

To you before the close of day,
Creator of all things, we pray
that, in your constant clemency,
our guard and keeper you would be.

Save us from troubled, restless sleep;
from all ill dreams your children keep.
So calm our minds that fears may cease
and rested bodies wake in peace.

A healthy life we ask of you:
the fire of love in us renew,
and when the dawn new light will bring,
your praise and glory we shall sing.

Almighty Father, hear our cry
through Jesus Christ, our Lord, most high,
Whom with the Spirit we adore
forever and for evermore. Amen.

SHORT RESPOND

CANTOR: Keep me as the apple of an eye;
CHOIR: Hide me under the shadow of thy wings.

NUNC DIMITTIS: Plainsong setting, Tone V.1

ANTIPHON: Preserve us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping;
that awake we may watch with Christ, and asleep we may rest in peace.

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace: * according to thy word.
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation. * which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the gentiles, * and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, * world without end. Amen.

THE APOSTLES CREED

CANTOR: I believe in God,
CHOIR: the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth; and in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord; who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried. He descended into hell. The third day he rose again from the dead. He ascended into heaven, and sitteth at the right hand of God the Father almighty. From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Ghost, the holy catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

THE PRAYERS

CANTOR: Lord, have mercy upon us.
CHOIR: Christ, have mercy upon us.
CANTOR: Lord, have mercy upon us.

The Lord’s Prayer and the following versicles and responses are intoned:

CANTOR: Our Father,
CHOIR: who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

CANTOR: Blessed art thou, Lord God of our fathers;
CHOIR: To be praised and glorified above all for ever.

CANTOR: Let us bless the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: Let us praise him and magnify him for ever.

CANTOR: Blessed art thou, O Lord, in the firmament of heaven;
CHOIR: To be praised and glorified above all for ever.

CANTOR: The Almighty and merciful Lord guard us and give us his blessing.
CHOIR: Amen.

CANTOR: Wilt thou not turn again and quicken us;
CHOIR: That thy people may rejoice in thee?

CANTOR: O Lord, shew thy mercy upon us;
CHOIR: And grant us thy salvation.

CANTOR: Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this night without sin;
CHOIR: O Lord, have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us.

CANTOR: O Lord, hear our prayer;
CHOIR: And let our cry come unto thee.

CANTOR: Let us pray.

At least three but not more than five prayers (or collects) are intoned by the CANTOR. The first collect is proper to the day. Other collects offered address the needs and concerns of the choir, or local or global community. The final collect is chosen from the following:

Be present, O merciful God, and protect us through the silent hours of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and chances of this fleeting world, may repose upon thy eternal changelessness; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Or

Visit, we beseech thee, O Lord, this place, and drive from it all the snares of the enemy; let thy holy angels dwell herein to preserve us in peace; and may thy blessing be upon us evermore; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Or, on Palm Sunday,

O Lord Jesus Christ, son of the living God, who at this evening hour didst rest in the sepulchre, and didst thereby sanctify the grave to be a bed of hope to thy people; Make us so to abound in sorrow for our sins, which were the cause of thy passion, that when our bodies lie in the dust, our souls may live with thee; who livest and reignest with the Father and the Holy Ghost, one God world without end.

CHOIR: Amen.

The READER announces the anthem to be sung. 

ANTHEM: Absalon fili mi – attr. Josquin des Prez (c. 1450-1521) or Pierre de la Rue (c. 1452-1518)

[The well-known motet Absalon fili mi, a lament by King David upon hearing the death of his son Absalom (2 Samuel 18), has long been attributed to Josquin des Prez. Recent scholarship suggests Pierre de la Rue as a possible composer. Ignoring the debate over authorship, we instead focus on the genius of the composition. The work is unusual for its use of exceptionally low clefs and multi-flat key signatures. The plaintive text “Absalon, fili mi” is repeated for more than one-third of the piece. Near the end, the composer paints the descent to hell using a descending third motive that maneuvers the listener (and singer) through harmonies quite distant from the tonic. Though we do eventually reach the “home key” at the end, it is not settling and the listener is left to ponder the immense loss portrayed in both the biblical and musical narratives.]

Absalon fili mi, quis det ut moriar pro te, Absalon?
Non vivam ultra, sed descendam in infernum plorans.


Absalom my son, if only I had died instead of you, Absalom!
I shall live no more, but descend into the depths of hell, weeping.

FINAL RESPONSES and BLESSING

The CHOIR sings the final versicles and responses, using a setting composed by Peter Hallock in 1956, the year of the Compline Choir’s founding:

CANTOR: We will lay us down in peace and take our rest:
CHOIR: For it is thou, Lord, only that makest us to dwell in safety.

CANTOR: The Lord be with you:
CHOIR: And with thy spirit.

CANTOR: Let us bless the Lord:
CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

The closing blessing is spoken:

READER: The Almighty and merciful Lord, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, bless and preserve us.
CHOIR: Amen.

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Compline in time of coronavirus: 3. Fifth Sunday of Lent

Choir 03-29-2020

The Compline Choir, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, Seattle, March 29, 2020

While St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle,  is closed to large gatherings, the Office of Compline is sung by a small contingent of choir members to an empty cathedral. Those singing the service are observing strict health precautions including the appropriate social distancing; members over 60 and others vulnerable to contagion are not invited to sing.

The Compline Underground (which originates from Seattle) is now issuing links to the Compline Service together with the texts of the music sung, as well as many of the texts of the unchanging parts of the Office. After the broadcast, the video stream link will change to the archived link, and when the podcast is available, that link will be activated.

To continue to see the words below, and the broadcast or video stream at the same time in another window, just right-click on the link, and select “Open link in new window.”

Live Broadcast            (The service has now concluded; use the Video Stream Archive link).

Live Video Stream

Podcast                       (This will link to the Podcast when it is released – 1 or 2 days after the service).

Video Stream Archive  (now pointing to YouTube)

Compline for the Fifth Sunday of Lent

A short passage of scripture is read.

ORISON: By gracious powers so wonderfully sheltered (Tune: Intercessor) – Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848-1918)

          – Translation by Fred Pratt Green (1903-2000), after Von guten Mächten by Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945). Note: The translation is Copyright © 1974 by Hope Publishing Co.

By gracious powers so wonderfully sheltered,
and confidently waiting, come what may,
we know that God is with us night and morning
and never fails to greet us each new day.

Yet is this heart by its old foe tormented,
still evil days bring burdens hard to bear;
O give our frightened souls the sure salvation
for which, O Lord, you taught us to prepare.

And when this cup you give is filled to brimming
with bitter suffering, hard to understand,
we take it thankfully and without trembling,
out of so good and so beloved a hand.

Yet when again in this same world you give us
the joy we had, the brightness of your sun,
we shall remember all the days we lived through,
and our whole life shall then be yours alone.

PREPARATION

READER: The Lord Almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
CHOIR: Amen.

READER: Beloved in Christ, be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: whom resist, steadfast in the faith. [I Peter 5: 8, 9a]

READER: But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

READER: Our help is in the name of the Lord
CHOIR: who hath made heaven and earth.

CONFESSION AND ABSOLUTION

READER: Let us humbly confess our sins unto Almighty God.
CHOIR: We confess to God Almighty, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, that we have sinned in thought, word, and deed, through our own grievous fault. Wherefore we pray God to have mercy upon us.

CHOIR: Almighty God, have mercy upon us, forgive us all our sins and deliver us from all evil, confirm and strengthen us in all goodness, and bring us to life everlasting. Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

READER: May the almighty and merciful Lord grant unto us pardon and remission of all our sins, time for amendment of life, and the grace and comfort of the Holy Spirit.
CHOIR: Amen.

The following is chanted.

CANTOR: O God, make speed to save us;
CHOIR: O Lord, make haste to help us.

CANTOR: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son: and to the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen.

CANTOR: Praise ye the Lord;
CHOIR: The Lord’s name be praiséd.

PSALM 130 – Peter R. Hallock (1924-2014)

Out of the depths have I called to you, O LORD; LORD, hear my voice; *
let your ears consider well the voice of my supplication.

If you, LORD, were to note what is done amiss, *
O LORD, who could stand?

For there is forgiveness with you; *
therefore you shall be feared.

I wait for the LORD; my soul waits for him; *
in his word is my hope.

My soul waits for the LORD, more than watchmen for the morning, *
more than watchmen for the morning.

O Israel, wait for the LORD, *
for with the LORD there is mercy;

With him there is plenteous redemption, *
and he shall redeem Israel from all their sins.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

The READER offers the following lesson:

Jesus said, “Come unto me, all ye that labor and are are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn of me: for I am meek and lowly of heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”
[Matthew 11:28-30]

CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

The following Respond is chanted (sung in a polyphonic setting on Palm Sunday):

CANTOR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.
CHOIR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.

CANTOR: For thou hast redeeméd me, O Lord, thou God of truth;
CHOIR: I commend my spirit.

CANTOR: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.

The READER announces the hymn to be sung.

HYMN: Out of the depths I call (Tune: Saint Bride) – Samuel Howard (1710-1782) and Geoffrey Shaw (1879-1943)

Out of the depths I call,
to God I send my cry;
Lord, hear my supplicating voice
and graciously reply.

My soul with patience waits
for thee, the living Lord,
my hopes are on thy promise built,
thy never failing word.

My longing eyes look out
for thy enlivening ray,
more duly than the morning watch
to spy the dawning day.

SHORT RESPOND

CANTOR: Keep me as the apple of an eye;
CHOIR: Hide me under the shadow of thy wings.

NUNC DIMITTIS: Plainsong setting, Tone V.1

ANTIPHON: Preserve us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping;
that awake we may watch with Christ, and asleep we may rest in peace.

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace: * according to thy word.
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation. * which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the gentiles, * and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, * world without end. Amen.

THE APOSTLES CREED

CANTOR: I believe in God,
CHOIR: the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth; and in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord; who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried. He descended into hell. The third day he rose again from the dead. He ascended into heaven, and sitteth at the right hand of God the Father almighty. From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Ghost, the holy catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

THE PRAYERS

CANTOR: Lord, have mercy upon us.
CHOIR: Christ, have mercy upon us.
CANTOR: Lord, have mercy upon us.

The Lord’s Prayer and the following versicles and responses are intoned:

CANTOR: Our Father,
CHOIR: who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

CANTOR: Blessed art thou, Lord God of our fathers;
CHOIR: To be praised and glorified above all for ever.

CANTOR: Let us bless the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: Let us praise him and magnify him for ever.

CANTOR: Blessed art thou, O Lord, in the firmament of heaven;
CHOIR: To be praised and glorified above all for ever.

CANTOR: The Almighty and merciful Lord guard us and give us his blessing.
CHOIR: Amen.

CANTOR: Wilt thou not turn again and quicken us;
CHOIR: That thy people may rejoice in thee?

CANTOR: O Lord, shew thy mercy upon us;
CHOIR: And grant us thy salvation.

CANTOR: Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this night without sin;
CHOIR: O Lord, have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us.

CANTOR: O Lord, hear our prayer;
CHOIR: And let our cry come unto thee.

CANTOR: Let us pray.

At least three but not more than five prayers (or collects) are intoned by the CANTOR. The first collect is proper to the day. Other collects offered address the needs and concerns of the choir, or local or global community. The final collect is chosen from the following:

Be present, O merciful God, and protect us through the silent hours of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and chances of this fleeting world, may repose upon thy eternal changelessness; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Or

Visit, we beseech thee, O Lord, this place, and drive from it all the snares of the enemy; let thy holy angels dwell herein to preserve us in peace; and may thy blessing be upon us evermore; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Or, on Palm Sunday,

O Lord Jesus Christ, son of the living God, who at this evening hour didst rest in the sepulchre, and didst thereby sanctify the grave to be a bed of hope to thy people; Make us so to abound in sorrow for our sins, which were the cause of thy passion, that when our bodies lie in the dust, our souls may live with thee; who livest and reignest with the Father and the Holy Ghost, one God world without end.

CHOIR: Amen.

The READER announces the anthem to be sung. 

ANTHEM: Lamentations of Jeremiah – Jacob Arcadelt (c. 1507-1568)

Anthem text from Lamentations 1:7 and 2:14
Zain: Jerusalem remembered, in the days of her affliction and of her miseries, all her pleasant things that she had in the days of old, when her people fell into the hand of the enemy, and none did help her. The adversaries saw her and did mock at her sabbaths.

Nun:  The prophets have seen vain and foolish things for thee; and they have not exposed thine iniquity, to turn away thy captivity, but have seen for thee false burdens and causes of banishment.

Jerusalem, Jerusalem, turn thee to the Lord thy God.

FINAL RESPONSES and BLESSING

The CHOIR sings the final versicles and responses, using a setting composed by Peter Hallock in 1956, the year of the Compline Choir’s founding:

CANTOR: We will lay us down in peace and take our rest:
CHOIR: For it is thou, Lord, only that makest us to dwell in safety.

CANTOR: The Lord be with you:
CHOIR: And with thy spirit.

CANTOR: Let us bless the Lord:
CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

The closing blessing is spoken:

READER: The Almighty and merciful Lord, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, bless and preserve us.
CHOIR: Amen.

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Compline in time of coronavirus: 2. Fourth Sunday of Lent: Laetare

Choir 03-22-2020

The Compline Choir, St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle, March 22, 2020.

While St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle,  is closed to large gatherings, the Office of Compline is sung by a small contingent of choir members to an empty cathedral. Those singing the service are observing strict health precautions including the appropriate social distancing; members over 60 and others vulnerable to contagion are not invited to sing.

The Compline Underground (which originates from Seattle) is now issuing links to the Compline Service together with the texts of the music sung, as well as many of the texts of the unchanging parts of the Office. After the broadcast, the video stream link will change to the archived link, and when the podcast is available, that link will be activated.

To continue to see the words below, and the broadcast or video stream at the same time in another window, just right-click on the link, and select “Open link in new window.”

Live Broadcast on king.org   (The service has ended. Links to Video Stream Archive and Podcast links will be active when available.)

Live Video Stream

Podcast

Video Stream Archive

Compline for the Fourth Sunday of Lent

BIDDING WORDS

ORISON: Now as the troubled day departs – M. Searle Wright (1918-2004)

Now as the troubled day departs,
Be thou, O God, within our hearts.
And grant our wearied spirits rest
Within thy heart, O Savior blest.

Give peace and calm to all this night,
Throughout the encircling darkness, light.
May we by thy great presence awed,
Be still, and know that thou art God.

PREPARATION

READER: The Lord Almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
CHOIR: Amen.

READER: Beloved in Christ, be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: whom resist, steadfast in the faith.

READER: But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

READER: Our help is in the name of the Lord.
CHOIR: who hath made heaven and earth.

CONFESSION AND ABSOLUTION

CANTOR: O God, make speed to save us;
CHOIR: O Lord, make haste to help us.

CANTOR: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son: and to the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen.

CANTOR: Praise ye the Lord;
CHOIR: The Lord’s name be praiséd.

PSALM 23 (Setting I) – Peter R. Hallock (1924-2014)

[EDITORIAL NOTE: This setting of Psalm 23, from 1987,  pre-dates the more commonly sung setting by just six months.
and was unknown until found in a stack of music atop Hallock’s piano after his death.]

ANTIPHON: I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.

The LORD is my shepherd; *
I shall not be in want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures *
and leads me beside still waters.

He revives my soul *
and guides me along right pathways for his Name’s sake.

Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil; *
for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

You spread a table before me in the presence of those who trouble me; *
you have anointed my head with oil, and my cup is running over.

Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, *
and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

THE LESSON

Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light (Matthew 11:28-30).

THE RESPOND

CANTOR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.
CHOIR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.

CANTOR: For thou hast redeeméd me, O Lord, thou God of truth;
CHOIR: I commend my spirit.

CANTOR: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
CHOIR: Into thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.

OFFICE HYMN: To you before the close of day (Tune: Te lucis ante terminum) – Plainsong, Mode VIII

To you before the close of day,
Creator of all things, we pray
that, in your constant clemency,
our guard and keeper you would be.

Save us from troubled, restless sleep;
from all ill dreams your children keep.
So calm our minds that fears may cease
and rested bodies wake in peace.

A healthy life we ask of you:
the fire of love in us renew,
and when the dawn new light will bring,
your praise and glory we shall sing.

Almighty Father, hear our cry
through Jesus Christ, our Lord, most high,
Whom with the Spirit we adore
forever and for evermore.

SHORT RESPOND

CANTOR: Keep me as the apple of an eye;
CHOIR: Hide me under the shadow of thy wings.

NUNC DIMITTIS: Plainsong setting, Tone V.1

ANTIPHON: Preserve us, O Lord, while waking, and guard us while sleeping;
that awake we may watch with Christ, and asleep we may rest in peace.

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace: * according to thy word.
For mine eyes have seen thy salvation. * which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;
To be a light to lighten the gentiles, * and to be the glory of thy people Israel.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, * world without end. Amen.

THE APOSTLES CREED

THE PRAYERS

CANTOR: Lord, have mercy upon us.
CHOIR: Christ, have mercy upon us.
CANTOR: Lord, have mercy upon us

THE LORD’S PRAYER

VERSICLES AND RESPONSES

COLLECTS by the Cantor

ANTHEM: Lamentations of Jeremiah – Alfonso Ferrabosco the Younger (c. 1575-1628)

[EDITORIAL NOTE: The anthem for this evening is a setting of the Lamentations of Jeremiah by the Elizabethan composer of Italian ancestry, Alfonso Ferrabosco the Younger. The text is the first three verses of Lamentation 1, each of which is indicated by appropriate Hebrew letters: aleph ,beth and ghimel. The scripture is preceded by an introduction, and is concluded by a respond appropriate to various offices sung during the liturgies of Holy Week.]

Here beginneth the Lamentations of the prophet Jeremiah:
Aleph. How lonely sits the city that was full of people! How like a widow has she become, she that was great among the nations!
She that was a princess among the cities has become a vassal.
Beth. She weeps bitterly in the night, tears on her cheeks; among all her lovers she has none to comfort her; all her friends have dealt treacherously with her, they have become her enemies.
Ghimel. Judah has gone into exile because of affliction and hard servitude. She dwells now among the nations but finds no resting place. Her pursuers have all overtaken her in the midst of her distress.
(Refrain) Jerusalem, Jerusalem, turn thee to the Lord thy God.

FINAL RESPONSES (setting by Peter R. Hallock)

CANTOR: We will lay us down in peace and take our rest:
CHOIR: For it is thou, Lord, only that makest us to dwell in safety.

CANTOR: The Lord be with you:
CHOIR: And with thy spirit.

CANTOR: Let us bless the Lord:
CHOIR: Thanks be to God.

[The closing blessing is spoken:]

READER: The Almighty and merciful Lord, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, bless and preserve us.
CHOIR: Amen.

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Compline in time of coronavirus: 1. Third Sunday of Lent

Choir 03-15-20

The Compline Choir, St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle – March 15, 2020

On Sunday, March 15, 2020, the Office of Compline at St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle, was sung by nine choir members and their director, Jason Anderson, to an empty cathedral – due to the closing of schools, churches, and other large gatherings because of coronavirus. It also occasioned the first live streaming of Compline in its 64-year-old history. The choir members singing observed strict health precautions including the appropriate social distancing; members over 60 and others vulnerable to contagion were not invited to sing. It is anticipated that this mode of offering the Office of Compline at St. Mark’s will continue for some time.

In its long history, the Compline Service has always been sung from the back corner of the Cathedral (and away from the direct field of vision of the congregants; thus the focus is not on the choir but upon intentional listening for congregants. Since 1962, when the service was first carried by KING-FM 98.1, and then on the world wide web live through king.org and through podcast at complinepodcast.org, the Compline Service has had a “virtual congregation.” Now, with the Cathedral closed temporarily, the congregation has become by necessity completely “virtual.”

For this reason, the Compline Underground (which originates from Seattle) will issue links to the rebroadcast of the service, enhanced at first with the words to four parts of the service (Orison, Psalm, Hymn, and Anthem), given below. For future rebroadcasts, more of the text of the whole service may be printed. This is offered especially for those who usually attend the service and are now confined to a “virtual” community.

To continue to see the words below, and the podcast or video stream at the same time in another window, just right-click on either the link to the Podcast or the Video Stream, and select “Open link in new window.”

Podcast

Video Stream

(The music for this service was selected with the current situation in mind. A setting of the Lamentations of Jeremiah is typically offered as the Anthem during the Sundays of Lent.)

ORISON: O Holy Spirit, by whose breath, life rises (Tune: Veni Creator Spiritus)– Plainsong, Mode VIII

O Holy Spirit, by whose breath, life rises vibrant out of death;
come to create, renew, inspire; come, kindle in our hearts your fire.

You are the seeker’s sure resource, of burning love the living source,
protector in the midst of strife, the giver and the Lord of life.

In you God’s energy is shown, to us your varied gifts make known.
Teach us to speak, teach us to hear; yours is the tongue and yours the ear.

Flood our dull senses with your light; in mutual love our hearts unite.
Your power the whole creation fills; confirm our weak, uncertain wills.

From inner strife grant us release; turn nations to the ways of peace.
To fuller life your people bring that as one body we may sing:

Praise to the Father, Christ, his Word, and to the Spirit: God the Lord,
to whom all honor, glory be both now and for eternity.

PSALM 91 – Plainsong, Tone IV.4

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High, *
abides under the shadow of the Almighty.

He shall say to the LORD,”You are my refuge and my stronghold, *
my God in whom I put my trust.”

He shall deliver you from the snare of the hunter *
and from the deadly pestilence.

He shall cover you with his pinions, and you shall find refuge under his wings; *
his faithfulness shall be a shield and buckler.

You shall not be afraid of any terror by night, *
nor of the arrow that flies by day;

Of the plague that stalks in the darkness, *
nor of the sickness that lays waste at mid-day.

A thousand shall fall at your side, and ten thousand at your right hand, *
but it shall not come near you.

Your eyes have only to behold *
to see the reward of the wicked.

Because you have made the LORD your refuge, *
and the Most High your habitation,

There shall no evil happen to you, *
neither shall any plague come near your dwelling.

For he shall give his angels charge over you, *
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you in their hands, *
lest you dash your foot against a stone.

You shall tread upon the lion and the adder; *
you shall trample the young lion and the serpent under your feet.

Because he is bound to me in love, therefore will I deliver him; *
I will protect him, because he knows my Name.

He shall call upon me, and I will answer him; *
I am with him in trouble; I will rescue him and bring him to honor.

With long life will I satisfy him, *
and show him my salvation.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

HYMN: All who love and serve your city (Tune: Charlestown) – mel. from The Southern Harmony, 1835; harm. Alastair Cassels-Brown (1927-2001), alt., and Jason A. Anderson (b. 1976)

All who love and serve your city, all who bear its daily stress,
all who cry for peace and justice, all who curse and all who bless,

In your day of loss and sorrow, in your day of helpless strife,
honor, peace, and love retreating, seek the Lord, who is your life.

In your day of wealth and plenty, wasted work and wasted play,
call to mind the word of Jesus, “I must work while it is day.”

For all days are days of judgment, and the Lord is waiting still,
drawing near a world that spurns him, offering peace from Calvary’s hill.

Risen Lord! shall yet the city be the city of despair?
Come today, our Judge, our Glory; be its name, “The Lord is there!”

ANTHEM: Lamentations of Jeremiah (Setting I) – Thomas Tallis (c. 1505-1585)

Here beginneth the Lamentations of the prophet Jeremiah:
Aleph. How lonely sits the city that was full of people! How like a widow has she become, she that was great among the nations!
She that was a princess among the cities has become a vassal.
Beth. She weeps bitterly in the night, tears on her cheeks; among all her lovers she has none to comfort her;
all her friends have dealt treacherously with her, they have become her enemies.
(Refrain) Jerusalem, Jerusalem, turn thee to the Lord thy God.

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Compline Choirs Respond to COVID-19

Compline Choir 1969

The Compline Choir, St. Mark’s Seattle, 1969. This group numbered fourteen, but only nine will sing Compline to an empty Cathedral starting March 15, 2020.

It’s now a national emergency.

Everyone across the US is responding to the novel coronavirus, but probably nowhere right now are the measures as severe as in the Greater Seattle area, where schools are closed in three counties until April 24, and public gatherings of over 250 people – sporting events, arts venues, and many churches – are now closed.

This includes St. Mark’s Cathedral in Seattle, where Compline has been sung every Sunday night since 1956. However, the office will still be sung (just as in 1956) to an empty cathedral. But unlike those old days before the service was broadcast and hundreds of people started to attend, the service will be carried to the thousands that listen live on the internet and radio, and also, for the first time, the Choir plans to livestream the service. For this and much more news, read the Spring Newsletter from the Compline Choir. And if you miss the service, you can also listen to previous services at complinepodcast.org.

In Nevada City, California, all church services that include large gatherings are also closed, but the Trinity Compline Choirs will sing Compline, also to an empty church. There are a number of choirs of different voicing which began singing the Office of Compline on the first Sunday of the month in May 2009 – these include the women’s choir Voces Angelorum and the male quartet Renaissance Man, which will sing on March 15. They will record the service and hope to make it available at their Facebook site, and invite you to Like their page!

Please add a comment, and tell what YOUR Compline group is doing during these challenging times.

 

 

 

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A Week at Salisbury

Compline Choir at Salisbury Cathedral

After a wonderful week at Canterbury, our England Pilgrimage 2019 continued with a week at Salisbury. Here we felt more removed from the tourism that surrounded the heart of the Anglican Communion, and the moving experiences of being so close to where our founder, Peter Hallock, had sung as a student at the Royal School of Church Music from 1949-1951. But Salisbury had been the center for liturgy in the Middle Ages (hence the name “Sarum Rite”), and the chants that we sing at Compline came from this rite. And for me, one of the highlights was to attend a workshop by chant specialist John Rowlands-Pritchard, and then sing Psalm 115 in plainsong that evening at the Evensong service. For this lover of both chant AND England, it doesn’t get much better!

Salisbury Cathedral has a most beautiful close with much green grass, and the tallest spire in England; also its proximity to Winchester and Stonehenge provided wonderful excursions, as you can see in some of the pictures taken during the week:

 

View from the Tower

Tower Tour Group

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vernon Nicodemus and William Turnipseed, who both were here in 2000.

Joel Bevington and Derek Curtis-Tilton at Old Sarum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ken and Jan Pendergrass at Stonehenge

Thomas Adams kneeling (in fealty?) at Old Sarum

Ken Pendergrass, Michael Bennett, Layne Benofsky, James Wilcox, and Derek Curtis-Tilton enjoying the downtown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We all enjoyed the resonant acoustics at Salisbury Cathedral, even though, like Canterbury, much of the choir area was in scaffolding, and the organ was under repair. Once again, Michael Kleinschmidt, Canon for Cathedral Music at St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle, played awesome preludes and postludes at Evensong on the substitute electronic instrument. “Field recordings” were made of all the music, but only one has been edited from Salisbury at this point. Listen to the fine work the choir does on the anthem for Saturday Evensong: “Their sound is gone out,” by Arthur Wills (b. 1926)

Their sound is gone out,
Gone out into all lands,
And their words unto the ends of the world.
Thou shalt make them princes in all lands
They shall remember thy name, O Lord,
From one generation to another.

Here is a diary of our whole week at Salisbury – a fitting conclusion to an England Pilgrimage that we will always remember:

Monday, August 19 – Left for Salisbury at 8:25 am -Tour of the Cathedral at 1:45 pm – Rehearsal, 3:30 pm – Evensong at 5:30 pm (Responses by William Harris, psalm 101 by Peter Hallock, Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis by William Byrd, Anthem “If we could shut the gate” by Peter Hallock) – Group dinner at the White Hart Hotel.

Tuesday, August 20 – Excursion to Winchester, returning at 3:00 pm – Rehearsal, 3:30 pm – Evensong at 5:30 pm (Responses by William Harris, Psalm 104:1-23 by David Hurd, Mag & Nunc by Stephen Sturk, Anthem “What Hand Divine” by Aaron Aas).

Wednesday, August 21 – Excursion to Stonehenge and Old Sarum, returning at 3:00 pm – Rehearsal, 3:30 pm – Evensong at 5:30 pm (Responses by William Harris, Psalm 106:1-12 by John Fenstermaker, Mag & Nunc by Grayston Ives, Anthem “I thank You God” by Tyler Morse).

Thursday, August 22 – Free day for sightseeing and visits.

Friday, August 23 – 9:00 Plainchant Workshop with John Rowlands-Pritchard at St. Thomas Church – Rehearsal, 3:30 pm – Evensong at 5:30 pm (Responses by William Harris, Psalm 115 plainsong (Tonus Peregrinus), Mag & Nunc by Philip Moore, Anthem “There is a balm in Gilead” by Jeff Junkinsmith).

Saturday, August 24 – Tours of the Salisbury Cathedral Tower in the morning – Rehearsal, 3:30 pm – Evensong at 5:30 pm (Responses by William Harris, Psalm 91 by Peter Hallock – Mag & Nunc by William Byrd, Anthem “Their sound is gone out” by Arthur Wills).

Sunday, August 25 – 9:10 am Arrive at Cathedral to rehearse – Sung Eucharist Service at 10:30 am (Mass a4 by Thomas Tallis, Motet “The Good Shepherd” by Alice Parker) – Rehearsal, 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Evensong (Responses by William Harris, Psalm 119:49-56 by Ned Rorem, Mag and Nunc by Charles Wood, Anthem “I Will Meditate” by Richard Proulx) – 7:00 pm Final Dinner at White Hart Hotel.

Final Dinner at Salisbury

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Men at Canterbury, Women in Seattle

Compline Choir at Canterbury Cathedral

Front Row: Jason Anderson (Director), Ken Peterson, Derek Curtis-Tilton, Joel Matter, Josh Sandoz, Paul Johns, Michael Kleinschmidt (Organist); 2nd Row: Jeff Ricco, Fred McIlroy IV, René Marceau, Ken Pendergrass, Gregory Bloch, Joel Bevington; 3rd Row: Scott Kovacs, Layne Benofsky, Michael Bennett, William Turnipseed, Gerard van Wesep; Top Row: Vernon Nicodemus, Jeremy Matheis, Thomas Adams, James Wilcox, Tyler Morse

August 2019 opened an entirely new chapter in the 63-year history of The Compline Choir from St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Seattle.

The Compline Choir made a pilgrimage to England where they resided in two places: Canterbury and Salisbury. At each cathedral, they sang six Evensongs (Evening Prayer) during the week, and also were the choir at the main Eucharist on Sundays. In addition, the choir sang the Office of Compline in the Crypt at Canterbury on Sunday, August 18.  The days were filled with morning rehearsals, planned excursions, and one totally free day on the Thursday while the choir was at Salisbury. In addition to the 23 musicians pictured above, there were seven others in our party, including Page Smith, who accompanied us on three anthems, and other choir spouses/partners, including my wife, Peggy.

Bell Harry Tower

Women's ComplineOn arriving at Canterbury, we settled into a wonderful facility that had been built since our previous visit in 2000: Canterbury Cathedral Lodge. If you take a look at some of the pictures of the lodge’s site, you’ll see it’s situated within the cathedral close. One of the first pictures I took was out our window of the sunrise on the Bell Harry Tower at 5:30 am on Monday, August 12, as I listened to the Compline Service from Seattle live – with The Women’s Schola in Residence, who sang Compline the three weeks we were away.

Rebekah Gilmore assembled a group of some of the best women choral musicians in the Seattle area to sing the services on August 11, August 18, and August 25. You can hear all three services by going to the podcast links for each of the three dates given.

Having Compline sung by a women’s choir at St. Mark’s Cathedral was certainly a history-making moment, and I want to speak more of this in a future blog. But in the meantime, I wanted to salute what had been up to now the only women-only choir in North America singing Compline – the Voces Angelorum of Trinity Episcopal Church, in Nevada City, California. Their director, Jeff Reynolds, has engraved upwards of 2000 pieces for Compline, including psalms by Peter Hallock, and I noticed that the women sang Hallock psalms each of the three weeks in Jeff’s arrangements.

Our week at Canterbury was filled with many memorable events, both musically and spiritually. It is one thing to attend a prayer service, but entirely another as part of a team that is leading prayer – and in such an awesome place, founded by Benedictine monks 1300 years ago, and the heart of the Anglican Communion. The fact that the organ was being repaired and covered in scaffolding did not dismay Michael Kleinschmidt, the Canon Musician of St. Mark’s Cathedral, who played exemplary preludes and postludes on the fairly decent substitute “appliance.” By the time we had sung our sixth Evensong we had really gotten into the rhythm of prayer, and it was a pleasure to share to Canterbury the music of American composers in our psalm settings by David Hurd, Ned Rorem, and Jason Anderson, or anthems by our own Tyler Morse, Erin Aas, and especially our founder Peter R. Hallock (1924-2014), who had been the first American choral scholar at Canterbury Cathedral from 1949 to 1951. Here’s a quick diary of our week:

Monday, August 12 – Our first rehearsal offsite; 1:45 – Archives and Library tour (where we saw “Thomas Tallis” in the 1541 list and “Peter Hallock” in an August 1951 entry); 5:30 Evensong (responses by William Harris, psalm 67 plainsong, Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis by William Byrd, Anthem “I thank you God” by Tyler Morse).

Tuesday, August 13 – Rehearsal offsite; 11:00 – Tour of the Cathedral, 5:30 Evensong (Responses by Leighton Jones, Psalm 69 by Jason Anderson, Mag & Nunc by Stephen Sturk, Anthem “Lamentations” by Peter Hallock).

Wednesday, August 14 – “No evensong” day for the choir – excursion to Chartwell and Leeds Castle.

Thursday, August 15 – Rehearsal offsite; free morning (we saw the ruins of St. Augustine’s Abbey); 5:30 Evensong (including Psalm 78 plainsong, Mag & Nunc by Grayston Ives, Anthem “Ave Maria” by Franz Biebl); 8:45 Candlelight tour of Canterbury Cathedral for our group, led by the Archdeacon, the Ven. Jo Kelly-Moore – an unforgettable experience.

Friday, August 16 – Rehearsal offsite; 10:15 excursion to Dover Castle and the Wartime Tunnels; 5:30 Evensong (including Psalm 84 by Peter Hallock, Mag & Nunc by Byrd, Anthem “If we could shut the gate against our thoughts,” by Peter Hallock); Group dinner at “Cafe du Soleil” restaurant in the evening.

Compline dinner

Dinner in “an upper room” at Cafe du Soleil in Canterbury.

Saturday, August 17 – Last rehearsal offsite;  3:15 Evensong (Psalm 89 by David Hurd, Mag & Nunc by Byrd, Anthem “Come, Holy Spirit” by Peter Hallock).

Sunday, August 18 – 9:15 prepare for morning service; 11:00 Sung Eucharist (Mass: Thomas Tallis Mass for Four Voices, Motet: “The Good Shepherd,” by Alice Parker); 3:15 Evensong (Psalm 119:17-24 by Ned Rorem, Mag and Nunc by Charles Wood, Anthem “What Hand Divine” by Erin Aas); 6:30 Compline (Hymn: Tallis “Canon,” Psalm 91 by Peter Hallock, Nunc Dimittis by Aaron Aas, Anthem “Bring us, O Lord” by Peter Hallock.

All of the services were recorded live, and there are currently three selections available in an “audio postcard” from the choir. The last is the complete Office of Compline sung in the Crypt at Canterbury. I have written extensively about the meaning of the Crypt to us in my book Prayer as Night Falls: Experiencing Compline, which is reprised in my post “Remembering Carl Crosier (1945-2014).” You can find there a link to another recording of the anthem we sang in the Crypt (both in 2000 and 2019) – Hallock’s “Bring Us, O Lord, At Our Last Awakening.”

Look for another post about our week in Salisbury…

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